Interview: Bridge Nine’s Chris Wrenn on How Sports Fans Helped Launch Have Heart, American Nightmare + Terror


This dude is the living embodiment of the hardcore DIY ethic.

interview bridge nines chris wrenn on how sports fans helped launch have heart american nightmare terror Interview: Bridge Nine’s Chris Wrenn on How Sports Fans Helped Launch Have Heart, American Nightmare + Terror


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In the spring of 2000, I was living with members of American Nightmare, who had just released their demo tape and had entered the studio with Kurt Ballou to record their self titled debut. @BridgeNine had released 6 records, all local bands who didn't tour. I started working at Big Wheel Recreation, at the time, one of Boston's most diverse and active indie labels. My monthly pay was a $1000 credit at a pressing plant that had terms with Lumberjack Distribution. I found myself with a band that wanted to work hard, with label guidance at BWR from Rama Mayo who had released a lot more records than I had, and a built in distribution deal with Lumberjack that I didn't deserve on the merits of my label, but more as a perk of my low $ employment. All I needed was money to help fund American Nightmare's EP. This was pre-crowd funding, you either had money or were loaned it by family or a bank. None of which were options for me so I had to improvise. I painted signs, sold random novelty bumper stickers to stores, and curated a small collection of B9 merch that I'd sell at shows. Over the winter, a friend at the time asked me to sell t-shirts outside of Fenway Park during Red Sox games. There was a random crew of guys who had started selling #YankeesSuck t-shirts in 1999 that we later referred to as "The 21'ers", because of their use of Roger Clemens' # on the back of their navy blue tees, and he wanted a piece of the action. We spoke about it briefly, but I was passed over for another roommate whose love of poker greatly outweighed mine. I'd already seen the opportunity to make the much needed money to fund AN's record, so I decided to make the smaller stuff that they didn't want to bother with. For the first three years until the 21'ers gave up and vacated Kenmore Square (and I stepped up to take their place, forming @SullysBrand), I sold anti-NY and pro-Boston bumper stickers, patches, enamel pins and flags. I pulled together a crew of friends and roommates to help peddle the merch, and while the hardcore kids of Boston's Mission Hill formed two groups of vendors, our crews shared friends, band & roommates. In June of 2000, after pressure from (continued)

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Interview: Bridge Nine’s Chris Wrenn on How Sports Fans Helped Launch Have Heart, American Nightmare + Terror

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